The number of phantom brewers is growing, and Mikkel, who got into the game in 2006, views this with a mixture of magnanimity and trendsetter’s pride. But he pays particularly close attention to one Brooklyn-based phantom brewery, because it is owned by his identical twin, Jeppe Jarnit-Bjergso. Jeppe started his brewery four years after Mikkeller began and, in an act of winking provocation, named the outfit Evil Twin. It is a smaller operation than Mikkeller, but similarly well regarded among connoisseurs. (Jeppe used to help Noma curate its beer selection.) The Bjergso brothers have opposite temperaments: Mikkel is reserved; Jeppe is an extrovert. And they are not on good terms, despite — or rather, because of — their shared infatuation with beer. They haven’t spoken to each other in more than a year.
Pocket : A Fight Is Brewing
What’s most fascinating about pad Thai, however, is that it probably isn’t even Thai. Noodles, stir-fry, and, especially, noodle stir-fries are quintessentially Chinese. In fact, just about every ingredient found in pad Thai isn’t native to the people after whom the dish is named. “The only really Thai ingredient is the pounded dried chillies,” the Bankok Post even admitted in February. Even the dish’s full name, kway teow pad Thai nods to its Chinese origins (kway teow is Chinese for rice noodles). “Its name literally means ‘Thai-style stir-fried noodles,’ and for a dish to be so named in its own country clearly suggests an origin that isn’t Thai,” local chef Kasma Loha-unchit notes in her own recipe. Indeed, the Thai seem to agree—in Thailand, it’s explicitly referred to as a Chinese noodle dish.
The strange and potentially stolen origins of pad Thai - Quartz
There were culture-building events like parties and baseball games. Employees would dress up for Wacky Wednesdays, sip mimosas on Friday mornings, and sunbathe on the office roof deck. Duplan was quickly becoming a star around Stanford’s campus — prompting both awe and jealousy — and not everyone was a fan.
A SILICON VALLEY DISASTER: A 21-Year-Old Stanford Kid Got $30 Million, Then Everything Blew Up
One theme implicit in Taibbi’s reporting is the extent to which the justice system’s newer kinds of inequalities are driven by technology. Computers encourage both the government and the banks to operate on a scale at which consideration of individual circumstance isn’t really possible. The result is unstoppable error by government (say, the frequent miscalculations that leave welfare recipients at constant risk of being wrongly accused of fraud) and unstoppable fraud by banks (say, ­robo-signing endlessly repackaged and resold mortgages and credit card debt). For both government and banks, such scaling up inevitably creates injustices for certain individuals, but so long as the victims are powerless there won’t be much of a legal or political reckoning. The person tossed into jail for welfare fraud he didn’t commit or tossed out of his house because he was mistakenly judged not to be paying his mortgage may or may not get it all sorted out in the end, but even if he does the feedback loop won’t impose too much pain.
http://nytimes.com/2014/04/13/books/review/the-divide-by-matt-taibbi.html
They do not make many Best Of album covers like this.

They do not make many Best Of album covers like this.

Working for free is a topic for another post (or series, or book, or endless context-heavy debate). But I wanted to get something out of the exercise. So here’s what I wrote about mornings, with just a dollop of after-the-fact editing and expansion.
Toward a Better Morning
‘80’s Fitness’ by KOAN SoundWhatever genre this is, I tend to like it. Just short of dubstep. I like a lot of things that are “just short.”

‘80’s Fitness’ by KOAN Sound
Whatever genre this is, I tend to like it. Just short of dubstep. I like a lot of things that are “just short.”

In other words, tech money threatens to do to James Freeman what it’s done to so much in San Francisco: that is, to grab hold of some largely good things — whether transitioning neighborhoods or communications tools — and make them take off at such a vertiginous pace that public goodwill toward them evaporates.
The VC Appeal of Extremely Fancy Coffee — Daily Intelligencer
"I am at war with the obvious" - William Eggleston (from New Yorker slideshow of a show)

"I am at war with the obvious" - William Eggleston (from New Yorker slideshow of a show)

The space where I post stuff more often. Maybe.

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